Namaste Kitchen

Posted on Saturday, 14th January 2012

Indian restaurant Namaste Kitchen is from the team behind Salaam Namaste in Bloomsbury and Sabir Karim who previously worked at Chutney Mary and Red Fort. Based in Camden, Namaste Kitchen boasts an inviting and modern look. The main point of focus in the restaurant is its modern Indian grill. Its open layout allows diners to watch the chefs at work as well as lap up the lovely warmth that it emits, a feature that was particularly inviting on a cold winter’s night. To complete its cosy feel, Namaste Kitchen plays host to a blend of exposed brick walls, American walnut veneers and cream leather seats.

We kicked of our meal with a spicy soft shell crab (£5.95) coated with a crunchy semolina batter. The crab was yummy, if a touch oily. Accompanying the crab was a sweet fig and prune sauce which worked well with the crab.

Spicy soft shell crab

Spicy soft shell crab

Plump pieces of pan seared scallops (£5.50) with a mango and tomato salsa were decent and nicely cooked, but slightly lacked for seasoning.

Pan seared scallops

Pan seared scallops

Rajasthan Laal Maas (£12.95), a spicy lamb curry with roasted red chillies and pulao rice, impressed. There was a nice richness in the sauce and the spicing was well done. The lamb was also very tender.

Spicy lamb curry

Spicy lamb curry

A generous portion of Goan style sea bass with rice (£12.95) was tasty. Pan fried and served with a sauce made from coconut and mustard seeds, the fish was fresh and of a good quality, although I would have preferred it to be slightly less cooked for greater moistness. The sauce, with a gentle hint of sweetness, was a good match for the dish.

Goan style sea bass

Goan style sea bass

From the grill, a coriander and green chilli marinated wild African jumbo prawn (£9.95 each) with Goan spiced salt and a pickled lemon dressing was pleasant, but did not boast of a strong flavour of spices.

African jumbo prawn

African jumbo prawn

A side serving of sesame baby aubergine with mustard and curry leaf sauce (£3.50) was particularly gratifying for its gooey richness. It again produced a hint of sweetness.

Sesame baby aubergine

Sesame baby aubergine

Less successful were the desserts. A mango brûlée (£4.50) turned out to be more of a mushy mango concoction and was not particularly creamy. It was also too sweet. In contrast, a pistachio kulfi (£3.50) was creamy, but lacked for a robust pistachio flavour.

Mango brûlée

Mango brûlée

Pistachio kulfi

Pistachio kulfi

This was a decent meal, made more so by service that was particularly attentive and thoughtful. The prices were reasonable and its ambience makes it well placed as part of the Camden dining scene. It’s a respectable choice if you happen to be in the area, the kind of place you might go to for a fun night out with a big group of friends.


Summary information

Food rating: 3/5
Service rating: 3.5/5

Price range: £17 – £30 for three courses. Excludes drinks and service.

Website: http://www.namaastekitchen.co.uk/

Namaaste Kitchen on Urbanspoon

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2 Responses to “Namaste Kitchen”

  1. Alia Says...

    went for dinner with a group of friends – the prices were steep for what we had – the food was ok not great – lacked flavour and the portions were small. we had a taste London card which they refused to accept!!

    i would not recommend this restaurant!

  2. abdul Says...

    as per i know that you are from Bangladesh how come you can cook indian food sabir can you pls tell me , where did you learn how to cook indian food in Bangladesh is diifrant from india
    i know you are copying every indian recipes trying to be best i cant be such stupid chef