Posts for the 'London' Category


Bo Drake

BO DRAKE

Found in the heart of Soho, Bo Drake is the brainchild of Jan Lee (a former chef de partie at Roka). Bo Drake opened at the start of 2015 and is a modern East Asian restaurant with a Korean-style anju bar. It draws predominantly from Korean and Japanese inspirations with a bit of a European twist thrown in. The result is a contemporary experience that combines, for example, the sweet and pickled influences from Asia with slow-cooked BBQ methods of the West.

The interior can be best described as a sleek casual hipster joint, with exposed bricks, pipes and tungsten lamps. The centrepiece is the bar fashioned from iroko with tall bar stools. Alongside it is simple wooden tables and there is a small dining area at the back.

On the whole Bo Drake offered a fine eating experience. The dishes were well presented, nicely cooked and creatively constructed. The menu is essentially a sharing one, with la carte dishes priced at around £10. It was an enticing menu, covering a good choice of smalls, meat, fish, veg, bowls and sides.

We began with some smalls. The first was the bugolgi beef sliders (2pc – £10.80) which were excellent and the star dish of the day. The minced beef was succulent and moist, and had been topped with some delicious caramelised red onions and crispy pancetta, all sitting in a warm and gently toasted brioche bun. It was well presented with some miso mayo on the side which was tasty.

Bo Drake - London Food Blog - Bugolgi beef sliders

Bo Drake – Bugolgi beef sliders

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Superstar BBQ, Bloomsbury London

Located on St Giles Piazza, next to Ippudo and Kanada-ya you will find a neat little Korean spot serving up traditional Korean dishes. You can see their BBQ hot plates firing Korean BBQ noticeably from the windows with diners preparing their BBQ meats to their liking. When you enter, you will be greeted with a spacious booth dining area, while the glass walls and high ceilings provide for a bright and airy space. The setting is ideal for a group dining experience.

We began our meal with the Yuk Hwae (£7.50), a traditional Korean beef tartare that was both delicious and fragrant, served with slivers of nashi pear this added texture and fruitiness. This was excellent.

Superstar BBQ - London Food Blog

Superstar BBQ – Yuk Hwae – Traditional Korean Beef Tartare

The Korean Fried Chicken (KFC) (5 pcs £5.50) was good with the kimchi mayo. However the batter of the KFC could have been crunchier to create the perfect KFC. In contrast, the Korean style spicy wings (5 pcs £5.50) were rather disappointing as these were bland.

Superstar BBQ - London Food Blog

Superstar BBQ – Korean Fried Chicken (KFC) with Kimchi Mayo

Pa Jeon – Seafood Pancake (£6.50) is a traditional Korean pancake served with pan-fried spring onion & mixed seafood. This dish was incredibly tasty, filled to the brim with delicious chunky pieces of seafood. At £6.50 this was exceptional value and very filling.  I would highly recommend having this dish.

Superstar BBQ - London Food Blog

Superstar BBQ – Pa Jeon – Seafood Pancake

Onto the main attraction – the Korean BBQ, we ordered a selection of meats and seafood from the menu to prepare over the hot plates. Everything we ordered were well priced and the serving sizes were very reasonable for their price point. These came with dipping sauces for added flavour. Overall the meats were of a good quality however, we found the overall experience of the BBQ was quite bland as they were lightly covered in oil for barbecuing. Most of the selection was not served marinated unless stated so I felt that it was important that the dipping sauces that accompanied the BBQ were really flavoursome to counteract the simplicity of the meats itself. Our favourite picks from the menu were the tiger prawns (£8.50), marinated lamb ($7.50), sesame & garlic sirloin (£8.50) and the rib eye (£10.55).

Superstar BBQ - London Food Blog

Superstar BBQ – (clockwise) Marinated Lamb, Sesame & Garlic Sirloin and the Rib Eye

 

 

Superstar BBQ - London Food Blog

Superstar BBQ – (clockwise) Squid, Pork Belly & Mixed Mushroom

Superstar BBQ - London Food Blog

Superstar BBQ – (clockwise) Pork Belly, Rib Eye & Tiger Prawns

Pictured above.

From the BBQ menu, we sampled the marinated lamb (£7.50), tiger prawns (£8.50), pork belly (£7.00), sesame & garlic sirloin (£8.50), rib eye (£10.55), squid (£7.00) and mixed mushroom (£7.00).

Overall, the meal and service was pleasant. However, the dishes from the al la carte menu stood out more than their Korean BBQ – the main attraction. There was an abundance of choice from the al la carte and BBQ menu, so there was plenty of good food to be savoured, perfect amongst a group of friends/co-workers.

Summary Information:

Likes:

1. Yuk Hwae – traditional Korean beef tartare was excellent.

2. Pa Jeon (seafood pancake) was delicious and filled with seafood.

3. Overall the Korean dishes were very tasty.

4. Price point, very good value.

Dislikes:

1. The Korean BBQ was ok considering this was the main attraction.

Food rating: 3.5/5

Service rating: 3.5/5

http://superstarbbq.co.uk/

SuperStar BBQ Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato


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Myung Ga Korean Restaurant

It’s mid-term and schools are out. There are no classroom lessons, but lessons from parent to child are taught on a daily basis. Some will be of the practical kind, like how to tie shoelaces, looking both ways before crossing the road or how to properly brush teeth. The kind of teachings about life that when we grow older, we simply take for granted.

Some of my life lessons I also learnt in my father’s kitchen. Like the one about always heating the pan first to the appropriate temperature to allow meat, etc, to brown. As a youngster, I knew not the science, but I knew it made food taste good, intensifying flavour by creating that little bit of extra crispiness on the surface of the food.

At a more technical level, browning occurs as a result of the moisture on the surface of the meat evaporating when it comes into contact with high heat. Consequently, a chemical reaction takes place whereby the proteins on the surface of the meat develop. It then leads to the caramelising effect which ‘browns’ the meat, adding not only flavour, but also a more appetising appeal with the added (brown) colour. ‘Browning’ is also known as the Maillard reaction, so named for the French scientist who first investigated the reaction. It is one of the reasons why when we partake in our beloved BBQs we always make sure the heat is high so that we get that wonderful outer layer of flavour and crispiness on our steaks and sausages. It is also the heat that creates that mouth-watering aroma of smoking, sizzling meat which makes the wait for the cooking food sometimes unbearable.

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